Glass half full

imageThe promised cornucopia of ‘Ongs on Day 6 of the tour turned out to be more like a glass half full, dear friends.  After an overnight stay at the very salubrious Big 4 caravan park in Wagga Wagga, we were in striking distance of a place called Yerong, about 46 kilometres to the south-west on the Olympic Highway. 

We decided to swerve this one not just because there were many other ‘Ongs to be had on the day’s itinerary but because early research indicated that Yerong’s name had been changed to ‘The Rock’. We did find a Yerong Creek on Google maps but as one might expect, the name was for a creek not a township.  So ‘ong we went – first stop, Adelong, still in Wiradjuri country in the Shire of Tumut at the foothills of the Snowy Mountains.

imageThe surrounding countryside is littered with rocks and Adelong Creek, a tributary to the great Murrumbidgee River, runs right behind the local museum where we stopped for a gander. It was there we were informed that Tumut Council installed its first Indigenous mayor, a  Wiradjuri Elder, Councillor Sue Bulger, in September of this year.

imageLike many towns in this area gold was the original drawcard for European settlement and we were reliably informed by Chris Gatley at the Adelong Museum that there’d recently been a resurgence in gold mining in the area.  A very attractive, well kept and social media active town.

Dead centre in Tumblong
Dead centre in Tumblong

Onto Tumblong, where the local War Memorial Hall is the only public structure of note.  Big enough for a cemetary, but. Lots of rocks around here too.

 

 

 

 

imageNext stop – Jugiong on the banks of the Murrumbidgee – not a town per se but a pleasant little grouping of a cafe and homewares store, a wine cellar, fruit and vege market.  Both water and rocks abound, as well as the odd cow.

image

You have arrived at your destination of Berthong
You have arrived at your destination of Berthong

And so our glass of ‘Ongs appeared to be filling up until we tracked north west via Young to three settlements (or so we thought) of Burrangong, Memagong and Berthong. Nothing more depressing than when the somewhat expasperated Google Maps ‘lady’ announces you’ve arrived at your destination, three times in a row, to find no town signage whatsoever.  Plenty of nice pastures of canola, wheat, sheep and cows but no ‘Ong recognition.  The first time in six days that this has happened!

Roos loose in the top paddock
Roos loose in the top paddock

So in the absence of any legitimate signage we thought we would wrap this post with some other signs, bearing our own interpretation of their meaning, for your general amusement.

 

 

Cows and sheep should be friends for at least the next few kilometres
Cows and sheep should be friends for at least the next few kilometres
Be careful how you stack the cows
Be careful how you stack the cows
Look out, school kiddies about
Look out, school kiddies about

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *